Discover Best Tips For Choosing PFDs Or Lifejackets…

choosing PFDs or lifejackets

Photo © by Allan Glanfield for Ontario Tourism

Your life may depend on choosing PFDs or lifejackets that keep you afloat. That’s good because I can’t recall the last time I spotted a Sea Doo, jet ski or Waverunner PWC operator not wearing a lifejacket or personal flotation device, commonly known as a “PFD”. In fact, PFDs are as much a part of Sea Doo riding as are wearing helmets for snowmobiling or motorcycling. As a safety item, PFDs have two primary purposes: to prevent drowning and to ensure that the wearer is highly visible in the water if help is needed. But when learning how to choose a PFD, they should not be confused with lifejackets…

choosing PFDs or lifejackets

Choosing PFDs or Lifejackets

A lifejacket is designed to turn an unconscious person from face down to face up in the water, allowing them to breathe. Alternatively, a PFD is meant to keep a conscious person afloat in calm conditions. There’s a life-saving difference between these two statements.

So for those less confident in the water – children, non-swimmers, seniors to name a few – a lifejacket, which is typically more buoyant than a PFD, is the better – if not the most fashionable – choice. But for those of us into boating, jet ski riding, Sea Doo tours and water sports, a PDF, which has floatation material in the back of the device, is less bulky and more comfortable. It allows for greater movement than a lifejacket and is a good choice for people who are confident in the water – and who understand the risks and limitations of wearing PFDs instead of lifejackets.

Choosing PFDs or Lifejackets – Bright Colours

choosing PFDs or lifejackets

So a PFD may not save you from drowning if you are unconscious or in the water long enough to become too weak to keep your face up on your own. What’s more, the odds of being in the water that long increase for those wearing PFDs that aren’t brightly coloured, such as the trendy ones that are all or mostly black. If you think being dark isn’t an issue, consider this: we did a test where two jet ski riders went overboard in wavy conditions, and even though we knew both were in the water, we spotted the person wearing a brightly coloured PFD much more easily and quickly. Same goes while you’re riding…it’s very important to be highly visible to other boaters, and that’s one more reason why choosing PFDs or lifejackets is critical. Note: Do not choose an inflatable PFD because they are illegal for PWC riding in Canada.

Choosing PFDs or Lifejackets – Rider Benefits

Whatever your choice, buckling your upper torso into a foam or neoprene flotation sheath has several other benefits for jet ski riders. You get some protection from body blows that may result from collision, hitting the water hard or jamming forward into the handlebars. You also receive some sun & wind protection, plus a degree of core warmth on chilly days. And last but not least, you have a handy tab to snap the end of your tether cord to so that if you do fall off, the cord attached to you will shut your engine so your jet ski will not continue on its own and leave you stranded.

Choosing PFDs or Lifejackets – What To Look For

choosing PFDs or lifejackets

Photo © by Craig Nicholson

There are a variety of suitable PFDs types and models available. Be sure to choose one that’s buoyancy rated to support your weight, fits properly by chest size (even over extra clothing layers you may wear when its cooler), is adjustable and has strong buckles that won’t come undone on their own. And I highly recommend that when it comes to choosing PFDs or lifejackets, pick the brightest colour possible – then be sure to wear it whenever you’re jet ski riding. After all, what’s more important, being fashionable or being alive?

Check out my favourite Sea-Doo rides!

If you enjoyed this post, check out my other riding tips.

The tips and advice in this article are the opinions of the author, may not work in every situation and are intended only for the convenience and interest of the reader, who has the personal responsibility to confirm the validity, accuracy and relevancy of this information prior to putting it to their own use.

 

Like This Post? Follow Me on Facebook!